We Teach Languages Episode 55: L2 Writing Instruction and Corrective Feedback with Heather Willis Allen

In episode 55, Stacey learns about designing instruction that promotes L2 writing development from Dr. Heather Willis Allen, associate professor of French at the University of Wisconsin – Madison. Heather is an accomplished teacher and researcher, co-author of a 2016 book on multiliteracies along with Kate Paesani and Beatrice Dupuy, and brings a research-informed perspective to topics such as how to provide written corrective feedback and how to scaffold assignments to help students avoid common writing pitfalls.

Or listen on iTunes!

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Show Notes

We welcome feedback, resources, and diverse perspectives on this topic! To contribute to the conversation started here, leave us a voicemail or send a text message to (629)888-3398. Or you can follow us on Twitter @weteachlang or use this contact form to send us an email.

You can learn more about Heather Willis Allen on her faculty page and can access many of her publications here.

You might remember Heather’s co-author Dr. Kate Paesani from Episode 49: Multiliteracies and CARLA Resources for Teachers with Kate Paesani

Some resources mentioned on the show…

…The Foreign Language Annals article Students’ and Instructors’ Perceived Value of Language and Content Curricular Goals by Nicole Mills & Samuel T. Moulton

The Undergraduate Spanish Major Curriculum: Faculty, Alumni, and Student Perceptions by Tammy Jandrey Hertel & Abby Dings

Hiram Maxim’s professional website where you can find quite a few PDFs of publications, including one paper on textual borrowing

 

Just as an aside, here is a resource on student writing that I really enjoyed and that presents another perspective. If you liked this episode, you might also enjoy this post from Senor Fernie: https://senorfernie.wordpress.com/2018/05/10/editing-final-projects-an-exercise-in-giving-up-micromanagement-part-1/

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We Teach Languages Episode 52: Story Listening and Efficient Acquisition with Beniko Mason

In episode 52, Dr. Beniko Mason joins the podcast to talk to Stacey about Story Listening and the most efficient way for learners to acquire language. In her four decades of teaching and researching, Dr. Mason has produced both impressive research as well as impressive results for her students. Be sure to check out the show notes to find links to her publications and current projects.

Or listen on iTunes!

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Show Notes

We welcome feedback, resources, and diverse perspectives on this topic! To contribute to the conversation started here, leave us a voicemail or send a text message to (629)888-3398. Or you can follow us on Twitter @weteachlang or use this contact form to send us an email.

Resources from the show…

…You can learn more about Beniko Mason and her work at her website.

… Storiesfirst.org is a resource for those interested in using Story Listening. Stories First Foundation was founded by two teachers, Claire Walter, a French and ESL teacher in Tennessee, and Kathrin Schectman, a German teacher in Erlangen, Germany.

…There is also a Facebook group Story Listening for Language Acquisition

…Beniko has published extensively. You can find a list of her publications here on her website, and Dr. Stephen Krashen also has several of their co-authored papers available on his website for download.

…Dr. Krashen and Dr. Mason have Story Listening workshops coming up this summer. You can find more information here: https://storiesfirst.org/learn/

Getting Started with Story Listening 
Learn the how and why of Story Listening in this one-day workshop with Beniko Mason and Stephen Krashen

Place: Los Angeles, CA 

Date: June 18, 2018
Time: 9:15 AM – 4:00 PM

Place: Portland, OR
Date: June 20, 2018
Time: 10:30 AM – 5:30 PM

Place: Syracuse, NY
Date: August 9, 2018 
Time: 9:15 – 4:00

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We Teach Languages Episode 49: Multiliteracies and CARLA Resources for Teachers with Kate Paesani

In episode 49, Stacey is joined by Dr. Kate Paesani, the Director of the Center for Advanced Research on Language Acquisition (CARLA) and affiliate Associate Professor in the College of Liberal Arts at the University of Minnesota. Kate tells us about the wealth of resources CARLA can offer teachers. She also discusses her research on multiliteracies, a framework that allows learners to engage with authentic texts in multiple ways.

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Show Notes

We welcome feedback, resources, and diverse perspectives on this topic! To contribute to the conversation started here, leave us a voicemail or send a text message to (629)888-3398. Or you can follow us on Twitter @weteachlang or use this contact form to send us an email.

You can learn more about Kate and her work on her CARLA faculty page.

To learn more about CARLA , the center Kate directs, visit carla.umn.edu

 If you are interested in learning more about the multiliteracies framework…
…the CARLA page on literacies http://carla.umn.edu/literacies/index.html
…a video of a presentation by Kate and her colleague Many Menke https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R5Cc1DA7Axk&feature=youtu.be
…Menke, M. R., & Paesani, K. (2018). Analysing foreign language instructional materials through the lens of the multiliteracies framework. Language, Culture, and Curriculum. DOI: 10.1080/007908318.2018.1461898
…Allen, H., & Paesani, K. (2010). Exploring the feasibility of a pedagogy of
multiliteracies in introductory foreign language courses.  L2 Journal, 2, 119-142.
…The learning by design page of the Cope & Kalantzis’s New Learning website: http://newlearningonline.com/learning-by-design (for an explanation and examples of the pedagogy)
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We Teach Languages Episode 46: Labor Issues and Language Teaching with Mura Nava

In episode 46, Stacey interviews Mura Nava, who teaches English to adults in France, about the state of the ELT (English Language Teaching) labor market. Mura shares his experiences as an English teacher in France and introduces us to some individuals and organizations working for justice for teachers. The episode also includes some information about adjunct labor in US higher education.

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Show Notes

We welcome feedback, resources, and diverse perspectives on this topic! To contribute to the conversation started here, leave us a voicemail or send a text message to (629)888-3398. Or you can follow us on Twitter @weteachlang or use this contact form to send us an email.

You can read Mura on his website ELF Notes or on Twitter @muranava. He also blogs at the website for the Teachers as Workers SIG. 

Here is Mura’s post we refer to in the episode: https://eflnotes.wordpress.com/2017/11/22/improving-working-conditions-isnt-that-in-the-remit-of-teacher-associations/ and the tweet we refer to!

Mura shared some organizations in Europe working to organize teachers including…

…SLB Cooperative in Spain on the web or on Twitter

…TEFL Guild on the web or on Twitter

…TAW SIG on the web or on Twitter

…ELT Advocacy on the web or on Twitter

Check out Geoffrey Jordan’s blog and the specific post Mura mentioned, and Twitter account that Mura mentioned in the episode.

Paul Walsh also has a blog.

For a hodgepodge of resources I dug up about ELT (English Language Teaching) around the world…

…an academic paper called Perspectives from within: Adjunct, foreign, English-language teachers in the internationalization of Japanese universities by Craig Whitsed and Peter Wright

…an article from the Japan Times For Japan’s English teachers, rays of hope amid the race to the bottom by Craig Currie-Robson

For resources on the adjunct labor market in the US and Canada…

…American Association of University Professors [AAUP]. (n.d.). Background facts on contingent faculty. Retrieved from https://www.aaup.org/issues/contingency/background-facts

…Modern Language Association Committee on Contingent Labor in the Profession [MLA]. (June 2011). Professional employment practices for non-tenure track faculty members: Recommendations and evaluative questions. Retrieved from http://www.mla.org/pdf/clip_stmt_final_may11.pdf

…this article from the Atlantic called There Is No Excuse for How Universities Treat Adjuncts by Caroline Fredrickson

…this guardian piece by James Hoff Are adjunct professors the fast-food workers of the academic world?

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We Teach Languages Episode 45: Thematic Units and Social Justice with Anneke Oppewal and Jennifer Wooten

In episode 45, Stacey talks with Anneke Oppewal, a middle school teacher in North Carolina, and Jennifer Wooten, a college instructor in Florida, about how they have transformed units on food and housing by focusing on questions accessible to novice and intermediate students. Anneke and Jen share specific examples from their own teaching–lessons and units they have built over time through collaboration and experimentation.

 

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Show Notes

We welcome feedback, resources, and diverse perspectives on this topic! To contribute to the conversation started here, leave us a voicemail or send a text message to (629)888-3398. Or you can follow us on Twitter @weteachlang or use this contact form to send us an email.

Both Jen and Anneke expressed that they would love to hear from listeners and possibly even collaborate with others doing similar work. You can email Jennifer Wooten here. You can email Anneke here or follow her on Twitter @an_oppewal

Resources…

…Anneke’s mini-unit on La Cosecha

EdPuzzle, a tool mentioned by Anneke that lets you turn videos into interactive quizzes

…Jen, Anneke, and a colleague’s ACTFL 2016 presentation on social justice that touches on many of the same issues discussed in this episode

…Jen, Anneke, and two colleagues’ ACTFL 2017 presentation on social justice that touches on many of the same themes as this episode.

…the book Anneke mentioned by Maria Souto-Manning with a forward by Sonia Nieto Multicultural Teaching in the Early Childhood Classroom.

…Terry ‘Osborn’s book Teaching World Languages for Social Justice.

Words and Actions: Teaching World Languages Through the Lens of Social Justice

ACTFL’s Critical and Social Justice Approaches SIG

Past episodes mentioned…

…check out ep 43 with Ryuko Kubota

…and ep 44 with Terry Osborn

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We Teach Languages Episode 44: A Preview of the 2018 Dimension Special Issue with Terry A. Osborn

In episode 44, Stacey shares an interview with Terry Osborn that she conducted as part of the 2018 issue of Dimension, the peer-reviewed journal of the Southern Conference on Language Teaching (SCOLT) . This special issue, which Stacey co-edited with Paula Garrett-Rucks, contains seven chapters all focused on how critical pedagogy and social justice play out in the language classroom. Listeners will get to hear a portion of the interview with Dr. Terry A. Osborn that comprises the first chapter of this special issue.

 

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Show Notes

We welcome feedback, resources, and diverse perspectives on this topic! To contribute to the conversation started here, leave us a voicemail or send a text message to (629)888-3398. Or you can follow us on Twitter @weteachlang or use this contact form to send us an email.

You can find Terry Osborn here. 

Resources…

…Terry’s book Teaching World Languages for Social Justice.

…Terry’s book with Reagan called The Foreign Language Educator in Society.

Dimension, a peer-reviewed journal from the Southern Conference on Language Teaching (SCOLT)

Words and Actions: Teaching World Languages Through the Lens of Social Justice

ACTFL’s Critical and Social Justice Approaches SIG

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We Teach Languages Episode 42: Choosing Critical Cultural Content over Grammar with Daniel Woolsey

In episode 42, Stacey interviews Daniel Woolsey, an associate professor of Spanish at a liberal arts college in Michigan, who teaches courses including fourth-semester Spanish and Hispanic linguistics. Daniel explains that language teachers can focus on critical cultural content, let go of explicit grammar instruction, and trust the acquisition process to take place.

In the month of March, we will be focusing on social justice and critical perspectives on language teaching to celebrate the March release of a special issue of Dimension, SCOLT‘s peer-reviewed journal. In this first of five episodes, Daniel Woolsey gets us started by showing that we can let go of grammar and embrace critical cultural content as the core of our classes.

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Show Notes

We welcome feedback, resources, and diverse perspectives on this topic! To contribute to the conversation started here, leave us a voicemail or send a text message to (629)888-3398. Or you can follow us on Twitter @weteachlang or use this contact form to send us an email.

Daniel Woolsey grew up in Santiago, Chile, and earned his Ph.D. in Language Education from Indiana University. He has been teaching Spanish at the college level for twenty years, including courses in Hispanic Linguistics and Language Teaching Methods. Daniel is especially passionate about first- and second-year Spanish courses: bridging SLA theory with teaching practices, and incorporating critical topics from culture, history and literature into beginning levels of instruction. He is co-author of two textbooks for first and second year Spanish courses, Ritmos: Beginning Spanish Language & Culture (2012, 2017) and its forthcoming intermediate counterpart Rostros (2019). Info and free demo of his textbooks can be found at: https://evialearning.com/ritmos-store.

For more information and to connect with Daniel, visit his faculty page.

For instructors interested in moving toward content-based communicative teaching, he recommends some resources…

Making Communicative Language Teaching Happen, by James Lee and Bill VanPatten

How Language Are Learned, by Patsy Lightbown and Nina Spada

…Bill VanPatten’s podcast Tea with BVP (Daniel loves whatever BVP is doing!)

Resources from the show…

…The 2017 conference https://hope.edu/academics/modern-classical-languages/crisis-management-innovation/

more about James Lee, the instructor Daniel mentioned from Indiana University

…MLA 2007 white paper Foreign Languages and Higher Education: New Structures for a Changed World

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We Teach Languages Episode 39: The GLCA Shared Languages Program with Gabriele Dillmann

In episode 39, Stacey interviews Gabriele Dillmann, an associate professor of German at Denison University, a liberal arts college in Ohio. Gabriele is the director of the Great Lakes Colleges Association’s Shared Languages Program, a project that aims to address issues facing upper-level under-enrolled language courses as well as broadening the course offerings for lesser-taught languages.

This episode also includes BONUS content! After you listen to the episode, check out the show notes for an additional 10 minute clip about the technology that makes Gabriele’s innovative work possible.


Click here to listen to the BONUS content for this episode!!! 

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Show Notes

We welcome feedback, resources, and diverse perspectives on this topic! To contribute to the conversation started here, leave us a voicemail or send a text message to (629)888-3398. Or you can follow us on Twitter @weteachlang or use this contact form to send us an email.

Gabriele teaches German language, German, Swiss and Austrian literature and culture and special seminars on psychoanalytic theory in the Modern Languages Department at Denison University, a residential liberal arts college near Columbus, Ohio. Her scholarly interests are vested in how digital technologies shape how we learn and teach now and in the near future. Her more traditional scholarship is in the area of German Romanticism and psychoanalytic theory, specifically suicide studies. Last year, she was awarded the Robertson Endowed Chair at her institution for her work in teaching, service, and scholarship. In addition to her teaching and research, she is the creator and director of the Great Lakes Colleges Association Crossroads Shared Languages Program for GLCA’s 13 consortial institutions.

You can find Gabriele Dillmann on Twitter @gabidillmann, her professional page, or by email

You can find more information about the Shared Languages Program at this website

Click here to listen to the BONUS content for this episode!!! 

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We Teach Languages Episode 38: Phonetics, Phonology, and Teaching Pronunciation with Gillian Lord

In episode 38, Stacey talks with Gillian Lord, professor and chair of the Department of  Spanish and Portuguese at the University of Florida, about her work researching and teaching pronunciation.

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Show Notes

We welcome feedback, resources, and diverse perspectives on this topic! To contribute to the conversation started here, leave us a voicemail or send a text message to (629)888-3398. Or you can follow us on Twitter @weteachlang or use this contact form to send us an email.

You can find Gillian Lord on Twitter @glordward, her faculty page, or by email

Resources mentioned on the show…

the Sounds Project from the University of Iowa is an excellent
way to show articulation of sounds. They have English, Spanish and German, and they also have a cool app.

… Gillian’s PDF of her presentation on teaching pronunciation. (Note from Stacey: This is an excellent resource if you want to know more!)

… Gillian’s 2005 article on teaching pronunciation: Lord, G. (2005). (How) Can We Teach Foreign Language Pronunciation? On the Effects of a Spanish Phonetics Course. Hispania, 88(3), 557-567. doi:10.2307/20063159

 

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