We Teach Languages Episode 61: A Throwback Episode with Dorie Conlon Perugini and Manuela Wagner

In episode 61, Stacey looks back at two episodes from 2017 in which two of the editors of the book Intercultural Communicative Competence Across the Age Range discuss the book’s origins and ideas. Check out the show notes for links to the full episodes as well as useful resources related to intercultural communicative competence.

 

Or listen on iTunes!

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Show Notes

We welcome feedback, resources, and diverse perspectives on this topic! To contribute to the conversation started here, leave us a voicemail or send a text message to (629)888-3398. Or you can follow us on Twitter @weteachlang or use this contact form to send us an email.

Dorie was originally on episode 8 and Manuela was originally on episode 27

Teaching Intercultural Competence Across the Age Range From Theory to Practice Edited by: Manuela Wagner, Dorie Conlon Perugini, Michael Byram

A few more resources on intercultural communicative competence…

… Byram’s excellent book Teaching and Assessing Intercultural Communicative Competence (ICC)

an entire issue of The Language Educator was dedicated to ICC in 2015. Manuela Wagner and Michael Byram wrote an article in that issue (as did Stacey Margarita Johnson, by the way)

an introduction to the intercultural dimension of language teaching by Michael Byram

an article by Michael Byram

an alternative take on ICC

We Teach Languages Episode 60: Community-Based Global Learning, Part II with Richard Kiely and Eric Hartman

In episode 60, Eric Hartman and Richard Kiely respond to listener questions about service learning based on their book Community-Based Global Learning: The Theory and Practice of Ethical Engagement at Home and Abroad. Richard and Eric approach community-based learning and global service learning from perspectives that language teachers will find immediately applicable to their own work whether they are taking their students into L2 communities as part of a course or preparing their students for lifelong community engagement as proficient language users.

This week’s episode is part II of the interview. Also check out episode 59 to hear part I in which Richard and Eric discuss the principles and experiences that inspired them to write their book.

Or listen on iTunes!

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Show Notes

We welcome feedback, resources, and diverse perspectives on this topic! To contribute to the conversation started here, leave us a voicemail or send a text message to (629)888-3398. Or you can follow us on Twitter @weteachlang or use this contact form to send us an email.

Check out the book Community-Based Global Learning: The Theory and Practice of Ethical Engagement at Home and Abroad, and, if you decide to buy a copy, use the discount code Eric and Richard shared with us to get 20% off the price of the book: CBGL20.

One WTL listener won a free copy of Richard and Eric’s book from Stylus Publishing!

Globalsl gathers teaching tools, activities, and syllabi, as well as more than 500 peer-reviewed resources on community-campus partnerships for ethical global learning. A growing breadth and diversity of organizations and institutions support the globalsl network, offering regular gatherings among a growing community of practice, collaborating on evaluation and assessment, and advancing fair trade learning principles of ethical partnership. The globalsl blog offers regular reflections and insights relevant to community-based global learning. To get involved, follow globalsl by signing up for email updates, or connecting on Facebook or Twitter, then consider authoring a blog post, attending a gathering, or becoming a member.

Eric Hartman is curious about the ways in which social transformation is simultaneously personal and structural, and thrilled to be working on both as Executive Director of The Haverford College Center for Peace and Global Citizenship. He is lead author of Community-Based Global Learning: The Theory and Practice of Ethical Engagement at Home and Abroad and has written for several peer reviewed and popular publications including The Stanford Social Innovation Review,  International EducatorTourism and Hospitality Researchand The Michigan Journal of Community Service-Learning. Eric served as executive director of a community-driven global nonprofit organization, Amizade, and taught on human rights, transdisciplinary research methods, and globalization in global studies programs at Arizona State University and Providence College. With a PhD in International Development from the University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public and International Affairs, Eric has worked in cross-cultural development practice and education in Bolivia, Ecuador, Ghana, Jamaica, Northern Ireland, Tanzania, and throughout the United States.   He co-founded both globalsl.org and the global engagement survey (GES), initiatives that advance best practices in global learning and cooperative development within community-campus partnerships.

Richard Kiely currently serves as Senior Fellow in the Office of Engagement Initiatives as part of Engaged Cornell, a large scale community engagement initiative at Cornell University.  As a community engaged scholar and practitioner, he is interested in learning about and contributing to the different ways people work together to have a positive impact on the world and the potential role of community engaged learning and research in higher education in facilitating that process. In 2005, Richard was recognized nationally as a John Glenn Scholar in Service-Learning for his longitudinal research that led to the development of a transformative service-learning model (Kiely, 2004, 2005, 2011). Richard has been faculty at the University of Georgia and Cornell and co-taught a graduate/undergraduate service-learning course in City & Regional Planning as part of the New Orleans Planning Initiative (NOPI).  The participants in this course developed a comprehensive recovery plan, in conjunction with community partners and Ninth Ward residents in New Orleans. A number of participants collaborated on a book describing the their experience with NOPI in Rebuilding Community after Katrina: Transformative Education in the New Orleans Planning Initiative (Reardon & Forester, 2016). Richard’s research focuses on institutional models that foster sustainable campus-community partnerships, faculty development in community engagement, community-based research, (global) service-learning, and critical reflection, as well as the transformational learning processes and outcomes that occur in community-engaged courses and community-based research programs.  Richard is also a co-founder of globalsl a multi-institutional hub supporting ethical global learning and community campus partnerships and continues to be an active scholar in the area of service-learning and community engagement in higher education.

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We Teach Languages Episode 59: Community-Based Global Learning, Part I with Richard Kiely and Eric Hartman

In episode 59, Stacey interviews Eric Hartman and Richard Kiely about the principles and experiences that inspired them to write the book Community-Based Global Learning. Richard and Eric approach international, community-based, and global service learning from perspectives that language teachers will find immediately applicable to their own work whether they are taking their students into L2 communities as part of a course or preparing their students for lifelong community engagement as proficient language users.

This week’s episode is part I of the interview. Stay tuned for episode 60 next week to hear part II in which Richard and Eric answer listener questions about community-based and global service learning.

Or listen on iTunes!

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Show Notes

We welcome feedback, resources, and diverse perspectives on this topic! To contribute to the conversation started here, leave us a voicemail or send a text message to (629)888-3398. Or you can follow us on Twitter @weteachlang or use this contact form to send us an email.

Check out the book Community-Based Global Learning: The Theory and Practice of Ethical Engagement at Home and Abroad, and, if you decide to buy a copy, use the discount code Eric and Richard shared with us to get 20% off the price of the book: CBGL20.

Globalsl gathers teaching tools, activities, and syllabi, as well as more than 500 peer-reviewed resources on community-campus partnerships for ethical global learning. A growing breadth and diversity of organizations and institutions support the globalsl network, offering regular gatherings among a growing community of practice, collaborating on evaluation and assessment, and advancing fair trade learning principles of ethical partnership. The globalsl blog offers regular reflections and insights relevant to community-based global learning. To get involved, follow globalsl by signing up for email updates, or connecting on Facebook or Twitter, then consider authoring a blog post, attending a gathering, or becoming a member.

Eric Hartman is curious about the ways in which social transformation is simultaneously personal and structural, and thrilled to be working on both as Executive Director of The Haverford College Center for Peace and Global Citizenship. He is lead author of Community-Based Global Learning: The Theory and Practice of Ethical Engagement at Home and Abroad and has written for several peer reviewed and popular publications including The Stanford Social Innovation Review,  International EducatorTourism and Hospitality Researchand The Michigan Journal of Community Service-Learning. Eric served as executive director of a community-driven global nonprofit organization, Amizade, and taught on human rights, transdisciplinary research methods, and globalization in global studies programs at Arizona State University and Providence College. With a PhD in International Development from the University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public and International Affairs, Eric has worked in cross-cultural development practice and education in Bolivia, Ecuador, Ghana, Jamaica, Northern Ireland, Tanzania, and throughout the United States.   He co-founded both globalsl.org and the global engagement survey (GES), initiatives that advance best practices in global learning and cooperative development within community-campus partnerships.

 

Richard Kiely currently serves as Senior Fellow in the Office of Engagement Initiatives as part of Engaged Cornell, a large scale community engagement initiative at Cornell University.  As a community engaged scholar and practitioner, he is interested in learning about and contributing to the different ways people work together to have a positive impact on the world and the potential role of community engaged learning and research in higher education in facilitating that process. In 2005, Richard was recognized nationally as a John Glenn Scholar in Service-Learning for his longitudinal research that led to the development of a transformative service-learning model (Kiely, 2004, 2005, 2011). Richard has been faculty at the University of Georgia and Cornell and co-taught a graduate/undergraduate service-learning course in City & Regional Planning as part of the New Orleans Planning Initiative (NOPI).  The participants in this course developed a comprehensive recovery plan, in conjunction with community partners and Ninth Ward residents in New Orleans. A number of participants collaborated on a book describing the their experience with NOPI in Rebuilding Community after Katrina: Transformative Education in the New Orleans Planning Initiative (Reardon & Forester, 2016). Richard’s research focuses on institutional models that foster sustainable campus-community partnerships, faculty development in community engagement, community-based research, (global) service-learning, and critical reflection, as well as the transformational learning processes and outcomes that occur in community-engaged courses and community-based research programs.  Richard is also a co-founder of globalsl a multi-institutional hub supporting ethical global learning and community campus partnerships and continues to be an active scholar in the area of service-learning and community engagement in higher education.

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We Teach Languages Episode 56: How to Write Comprehensible Texts with Martina Bex

In episode 56, Stacey talks with Martina Bex, whom many listeners might recognize from her blog, the Comprehensible Classroom. Martina tells us about her journey of figuring out what works best for her classroom and outlines how teachers can write comprehensible texts for their students. If you want to create your own level-appropriate written and oral L2 texts in order to bring in culture or current events, this episode will get you started.

Or listen on iTunes!

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Show Notes

We welcome feedback, resources, and diverse perspectives on this topic! To contribute to the conversation started here, leave us a voicemail or send a text message to (629)888-3398. Or you can follow us on Twitter @weteachlang or use this contact form to send us an email.

You can learn more about Martina Bex and the resources she makes available on her website The Comprehensible Classroom, on Facebook, or on Twitter @MartinaBex

Check out this excellent blog post Martina wrote in response to a listener question about this episode!

Martina read from the leveled reader about Brandon wanting a big dog. You can find that book along with others by Fluency Matters here.

Note: At one point in the interview, I refer to talking about culture using “your 10%”. I was referring to the ACTFL guideline of using the target language 90+% of the time during instruction, and how teachers might use that 10% of L1 in class.

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We Teach Languages Episode 45: Thematic Units and Social Justice with Anneke Oppewal and Jennifer Wooten

In episode 45, Stacey talks with Anneke Oppewal, a middle school teacher in North Carolina, and Jennifer Wooten, a college instructor in Florida, about how they have transformed units on food and housing by focusing on questions accessible to novice and intermediate students. Anneke and Jen share specific examples from their own teaching–lessons and units they have built over time through collaboration and experimentation.

 

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Show Notes

We welcome feedback, resources, and diverse perspectives on this topic! To contribute to the conversation started here, leave us a voicemail or send a text message to (629)888-3398. Or you can follow us on Twitter @weteachlang or use this contact form to send us an email.

Both Jen and Anneke expressed that they would love to hear from listeners and possibly even collaborate with others doing similar work. You can email Jennifer Wooten here. You can email Anneke here or follow her on Twitter @an_oppewal

Resources…

…Anneke’s mini-unit on La Cosecha

EdPuzzle, a tool mentioned by Anneke that lets you turn videos into interactive quizzes

…Jen, Anneke, and a colleague’s ACTFL 2016 presentation on social justice that touches on many of the same issues discussed in this episode

…Jen, Anneke, and two colleagues’ ACTFL 2017 presentation on social justice that touches on many of the same themes as this episode.

…the book Anneke mentioned by Maria Souto-Manning with a forward by Sonia Nieto Multicultural Teaching in the Early Childhood Classroom.

…Terry ‘Osborn’s book Teaching World Languages for Social Justice.

Words and Actions: Teaching World Languages Through the Lens of Social Justice

ACTFL’s Critical and Social Justice Approaches SIG

Past episodes mentioned…

…check out ep 43 with Ryuko Kubota

…and ep 44 with Terry Osborn

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We Teach Languages Episode 44: A Preview of the 2018 Dimension Special Issue with Terry A. Osborn

In episode 44, Stacey shares an interview with Terry Osborn that she conducted as part of the 2018 issue of Dimension, the peer-reviewed journal of the Southern Conference on Language Teaching (SCOLT) . This special issue, which Stacey co-edited with Paula Garrett-Rucks, contains seven chapters all focused on how critical pedagogy and social justice play out in the language classroom. Listeners will get to hear a portion of the interview with Dr. Terry A. Osborn that comprises the first chapter of this special issue.

 

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Show Notes

We welcome feedback, resources, and diverse perspectives on this topic! To contribute to the conversation started here, leave us a voicemail or send a text message to (629)888-3398. Or you can follow us on Twitter @weteachlang or use this contact form to send us an email.

You can find Terry Osborn here. 

Resources…

…Terry’s book Teaching World Languages for Social Justice.

…Terry’s book with Reagan called The Foreign Language Educator in Society.

Dimension, a peer-reviewed journal from the Southern Conference on Language Teaching (SCOLT)

Words and Actions: Teaching World Languages Through the Lens of Social Justice

ACTFL’s Critical and Social Justice Approaches SIG

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We Teach Languages Episode 42: Choosing Critical Cultural Content over Grammar with Daniel Woolsey

In episode 42, Stacey interviews Daniel Woolsey, an associate professor of Spanish at a liberal arts college in Michigan, who teaches courses including fourth-semester Spanish and Hispanic linguistics. Daniel explains that language teachers can focus on critical cultural content, let go of explicit grammar instruction, and trust the acquisition process to take place.

In the month of March, we will be focusing on social justice and critical perspectives on language teaching to celebrate the March release of a special issue of Dimension, SCOLT‘s peer-reviewed journal. In this first of five episodes, Daniel Woolsey gets us started by showing that we can let go of grammar and embrace critical cultural content as the core of our classes.

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Show Notes

We welcome feedback, resources, and diverse perspectives on this topic! To contribute to the conversation started here, leave us a voicemail or send a text message to (629)888-3398. Or you can follow us on Twitter @weteachlang or use this contact form to send us an email.

Daniel Woolsey grew up in Santiago, Chile, and earned his Ph.D. in Language Education from Indiana University. He has been teaching Spanish at the college level for twenty years, including courses in Hispanic Linguistics and Language Teaching Methods. Daniel is especially passionate about first- and second-year Spanish courses: bridging SLA theory with teaching practices, and incorporating critical topics from culture, history and literature into beginning levels of instruction. He is co-author of two textbooks for first and second year Spanish courses, Ritmos: Beginning Spanish Language & Culture (2012, 2017) and its forthcoming intermediate counterpart Rostros (2019). Info and free demo of his textbooks can be found at: https://evialearning.com/ritmos-store.

For more information and to connect with Daniel, visit his faculty page.

For instructors interested in moving toward content-based communicative teaching, he recommends some resources…

Making Communicative Language Teaching Happen, by James Lee and Bill VanPatten

How Language Are Learned, by Patsy Lightbown and Nina Spada

…Bill VanPatten’s podcast Tea with BVP (Daniel loves whatever BVP is doing!)

Resources from the show…

…The 2017 conference https://hope.edu/academics/modern-classical-languages/crisis-management-innovation/

more about James Lee, the instructor Daniel mentioned from Indiana University

…MLA 2007 white paper Foreign Languages and Higher Education: New Structures for a Changed World

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Transcript of Episode 30 with Patrick Murphy

Transcript of Episode 30: Fear of Failure, Twitter, and Virtual Reality with Patrick Murphy

[background music]

Stacey Margarita Johnson:  This is “We Teach Languages,” a podcast about language teaching from the diverse perspectives of real teachers.

I’m Stacey Margarita Johnson. Today, on episode 30, Jose Luis de Ramon Ruiz interviews Patrick Murphy about how his teaching has changed during his nearly 20‑year career teaching language courses at the university level.

It’s an exciting, wide‑ranging conversation that I think many of us will relate to about how radically technology has transformed, and about how important it is for teachers to be fearless in their risk‑taking sometimes, and really model that behavior for students as well.

[music]

Jose Luis de Ramon Ruiz:  I’m really excited to be here today with Professor Patrick Murphy, who is a senior lecturer of Spanish at Vanderbilt University. He has taught elementary and intermediate level, reading and translation courses. He has led study abroad, groups in Cuba, and in other countries in Latin America. This semester, he’s also the coordinator of the Spanish 1103, an intensive Elementary Spanish class.

Thank you so much, Patrick, for joining us today.

Patrick Murphy:  Thank you.

Jose:  Why don’t you tell us about the class that you are teaching this semester? Who are your students? What’s their level?

Patrick:  Currently, I’m teaching a class that’s, we call it Spanish 1103, which is an intensive course for beginners. Essentially, we take Elementary Spanish and we have students who are typically high‑beginners. That’s what we like to call them because they’ve had some experience with Spanish. They come into our class and we basically go over the elementary function of the language.

We try to get them ready for the intermediate course, which would be the next step of matriculation here at Vanderbilt.

Jose:  Nice. I think you started teaching in 1999. I was wondering how your teaching practices have changed over the past years.

Patrick:  My practices have changed greatly and I would say that is due to the advances in technology obviously. I think when I first started teaching, I was using an overhead projector with a dry erase markers and chalk on a daily basis. I was making tons of photocopies, bringing handouts to class typically. Those days [laughs] are long gone at this point.

I think the biggest difference has been the technology that I use in classroom now every day. Not just in the classroom, but with the assessment. I don’t collect a lot of work anymore. Most of the work, they’re submitted online.

Homeworks, they’re submitted online. Compositions and essays, they’re all submitted online. Writing assessments, writing assignments, they’re all submitted online.

I project on the overhead, everything I use is either something I can pull up from an online resource, or it’s a document that I have that I can project, or we use social media in class. There are a number of advances in technology that I have taken advantage of in my teaching, especially in the last five years, that have made significant changes in how I teach from when I started in ’99 to now for sure.

Jose:  Obviously, we live in a technological world. I agree that we should make use of all the resources available to improve language teaching. You mentioned social media. How does Twitter, or Facebook, or any other social media platform help your students achieve their goal in class?

Patrick:  One of our goals is to make cultural connections. As nice as the book will tend to present cultural information, I think our book in particular we use for the high‑beginner course does a nice job with cultural information. It can be outdated the moment it goes to print. We want the students to be connected to the culture that is happening in real time.

The best way to do that, and the way they are very familiar with, is through social media. I use Twitter specifically in my 1103 class because it allows students to get information quickly and a lot of information in real time. They can look at the information. They can read it. They can make a personal connection to it. They can correspond with whatever topics we’re talking about in class.

Whether it’s related to a specific country in a Spanish‑speaking world or it’s related to the topic for whatever chapter we’re studying. They’re able to connect to those topics and those other cultures in real time, and it’s been really fascinating to watch the students connect that way without having to use the textbooks all the time for cultural information.

The other thing we use it for is for writing. I like to do exercises with Twitter where the students can write things in real time and tweet it so I can project it.

We can filter through and look at it together on the overhead and on the projector screen, and actually look at what they’re writing, and then make error correction explicit, error correction while we’re in class, and we can see their tweets live. It’s been a really useful tool for writing as well.

Jose:  What would you say to professors or instructors who are wanting to implement technology, who are wanting to use Twitter in their classes for the first time? Could you give them any piece of advice?

Patrick:  My best piece of advice for that is to try it, to make the attempt. I think the scariest thing for me as an instructor has always been trying new things. It took me a number of years to ever want to try new things because I was always worried about failure in the room, in front of the class. I never wanted to fail or look like I didn’t know what I was doing in front of my students.

That fear would impede my evolution as an instructor. What I started to do, and I started it with Twitter, was just to throw it out there and see what happens. As scary as it was for me at first, it altered the way I teach because I just started to see what worked.

The very first time I started using Twitter in the classroom, it didn’t work very well. It was very confusing for the students on how to use the hashtag, or what to tweet, or how to find the information. It took a number of weeks and even a few semesters before I finally found a system that worked. But now, it seems to work so well. It’s opened my eyes to many other things I can try to do with technology and anything in general with any part of my teaching, is to just try new things.

If I could give a piece of advice to any upcoming instructor, is don’t be afraid to try new things. Make sure you push the envelope because that’s how we evolve. That’s how we become better. That’s how our students will become more confident and comfortable with the language in the world we live in today. I really think so.

Jose:  That’s a really good piece of advice. I agree that we learn through trial and error. I think it’s important to be OK with making mistakes, yes. Try new things, see how they work, and then we can make changes from there. That’s very true.

We have been talking about some really interesting and effective teaching practices. I was wondering if you could define excellent teaching for you. What does it look like?

Patrick:  For me, excellence in teaching is innovation and evolution. What I mean by that is innovation is trying to be creative with how you teach because my goal was for my students to become intermediate speakers. I want them to be comfortable and competent with the elementary basics of Spanish.

In order to do that, I try to innovate ways to help them become more competent and more comfortable and enjoying the language. For me, excellence in teaching is pushing that envelope, pushing new ways, becoming a better instructor that way.

Jose:  I completely agree. Finally, before we wrap up the interview, I would like to ask you, what are you most excited about in your job right now? Is there anything in particular that you are very…?

Patrick:  Actually, there is. I am pretty excited because there’s new things I’m thinking about all the time, but right now, I’m actually thinking about how to incorporate some virtual reality technology in the classroom, which is really cool. The genesis it is for me anyway was we got a pair of virtual reality headset. We got some VR, the goggles, and we got it last year as a gift for my son.

I started to just fool around with him and play with it and realized that this could be something I could use in the classroom with my teaching. It’s so immersive because you can literally put the headset on and you can travel to just about anywhere in the world with a lot of the different applications. What I would like to do is figure a way that I can incorporate that into class.

It’s actually really exciting because there are people here at Vanderbilt that are actually kicking this idea around as well. We have a working group here at the Center for Second Language Studies that’s actually meeting this afternoon. [laughs] We’re going to start talking about how we can actually practically use this type of technology in the classroom. I’m super excited about that.

Again, it’s probably going to be something that I will trial and have a lot of trial and error with. I’ll give it a shot. Maybe this semester, I might try to pilot an activity or two with one of my classes. Maybe implement it a little more next semester and just see how it goes. It looks really cool, so let’s see.

Jose:  It does look very cool. I’m looking forward to hearing more about that in the future because I would love to try that myself as well.

Patrick:  It looks pretty fun.

Jose:  Thank you so much, Patrick, for doing this interview with us today.

Patrick:  Yeah, great. Thank you.

Jose:  It was a pleasure to talk to you. I hope you have a great rest of the semester.

[background music]

Patrick:  Thanks, you too.

Stacey:  The two main technologies that Patrick mentioned in this interview were Twitter and virtual reality. We’ve actually had a couple of guests talked about how they use Twitter in the classroom. We’ve had many guests talked about how they use Twitter for professional development. But, Twitter in the classroom for language learning specifically was brought up in episode 13 by Noah Geisel and then again in episode 14 by Lisa Shepard. I’m going to put links to both of those episodes in the show notes.

If you haven’t listened to that far back, if you’ve just started recently, you can go back and check out those two episodes, which happen to be two of our most popular episodes of all time also, definitely worth checking out in any case. I think this is the first time we’ve had someone mentioned virtual reality as part of a language classroom.

I wanted to mention a few things that I’ve come across recently that are related. One actually was a couple of years ago. October of 2015, I was at a conference for the Midwest Association for Language Learning Technology, MWALLT, at Valparaiso University in Indiana. I got to go to a presentation by a faculty member named Carlos Miguel‑Pueyo, who’s an Associate Professor of Foreign Languages there, who presented on how he is working together with other units on campus to provide immersive virtual reality opportunities for his students. The presentation was called When Content Comes to Life ‑‑ Using Virtual Reality to Teach Spanish Civilization. I put a link to Carlos’ faculty page at Valparaiso University in the show notes. In case any of you guys would like to follow up on some of his work, maybe check out some of his publications on similar topics.

I also recently ran across a blog post, like a press release sort of blog post from the University of Texas at San Antonio, describing how last fall some of their language classes were using virtual reality in the classroom. There’s a really fun picture on the site. If you follow the link, there’s a really fun picture of all the students in class wearing their goggles, their virtual reality goggles. [laughs]

I think there’s a lot of opportunities to give students the feeling of being able to travel through virtual reality. What I’m most interested is how are people applying virtual reality in really pedagogically interesting ways. Not just as value added but really integrating it and making it something that’s encouraging language learning in very specific ways.

If any of you out there have experience with virtual reality, have concerns about virtual reality, or maybe have ideas for how it could be a really pedagogically effective tool, I would love for you to use Facebook, Twitter, or particularly actually the comments section of the website underneath this blog post that contains the episode.

I would love to get a running list of how people are working on this or thinking about this. We can have a site that I or other people working on this issue can go back to over time, and maybe get some great ideas and inspiration, and follow up with people and ask questions about what’s currently going on.

Very closely related to virtual reality is the idea of augmented reality.

This is the Pokemon Go phenomenon. You see a picture of what’s really there but your screen augments it with other things that aren’t actually there. I found a really interesting funded research project from Indiana University. It’s in the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning vein, which is definitely my jam. That’s I’m all about, [laughs] the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning.

You get to read the entire 23‑page proposal at the link that I’m going to share on the show notes. This is a really fun topic and I would love to hear all of your thoughts.

Please leave comments on the website, or just add us on Twitter, or post on Facebook. We would love to hear from you. All right, if you are interested in being a contributor just like Jose Luis, please let me know.

My highest hope for the podcast actually is that we feel like it belongs to all of us. Hence the title We Teach Languages and that teachers who know teachers who are doing really cool things will interview them, and then submit those interview recordings to the show so I can turn them into podcast episodes.

[background music]

Stacey:  If you are interested in being a contributor, in interviewing someone, and having your interview on the show, please let me know. You can email me at weteachlang@gmail.com. You can @ us on Twitter @weteachlang. You can really find us all over the place, so reach out.

I would love to share with you how you can become a contributor and get someone that you know and love as our next guest on the podcast. Thanks for listening. Bye‑bye.

We Teach Languages Episode 30: Fear of Failure, Twitter, and Virtual Reality with Patrick Murphy

In episode 30, Jose Luis de Ramon Ruiz interviews Patrick Murphy about how his teaching has changed during his nearly 20 year career teaching language courses at the university level. In their conversation, they touch on how Patrick uses Twitter to connect students to real-time culture as well as his future plans for virtual reality as a learning tool. Patrick also discusses how being afraid to fail can keep teachers from taking important risks in their classrooms.

 

 

You can read the transcript of this episode here.

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Show Notes

We welcome feedback, resources, and diverse perspectives on this topic! To contribute to the conversation started here, leave us a voicemail or send a text message to (629)888-3398. Or you can follow us on Twitter @weteachlang or use this contact form to send us an email.

You can find Patrick Murphy online…

…at his faculty profile

…by email patrick.r.murphy@vanderbilt.edu

…or on Twitter @murphyfall2014

You can find Jose Luis de Ramon Ruiz online…

…by email joseluisdr.ruiz@vanderbilt.edu

To learn more about the other virtual and augmented reality projects mentioned on the episode, here are some more links…

…faculty page for Professor Carlos Miguel-Pueyo

virtual reality for language learning at University of Texas San Antonio

…Indiana’s funded SOTL research project on augmented reality

We have heard from other teachers on the show who have used Twitter in interesting ways in their teaching…

Noah Geisel on episode 13

Lisa Shepard on episode 14

 

 

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