We Teach Languages Episode 59: Community-Based Global Learning, Part I with Richard Kiely and Eric Hartman

In episode 59, Stacey interviews Eric Hartman and Richard Kiely about the principles and experiences that inspired them to write the book Community-Based Global Learning. Richard and Eric approach international, community-based, and global service learning from perspectives that language teachers will find immediately applicable to their own work whether they are taking their students into L2 communities as part of a course or preparing their students for lifelong community engagement as proficient language users.

This week’s episode is part I of the interview. Stay tuned for episode 60 next week to hear part II in which Richard and Eric answer listener questions about community-based and global service learning.

Or listen on iTunes!

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Show Notes

We welcome feedback, resources, and diverse perspectives on this topic! To contribute to the conversation started here, leave us a voicemail or send a text message to (629)888-3398. Or you can follow us on Twitter @weteachlang or use this contact form to send us an email.

Check out the book Community-Based Global Learning: The Theory and Practice of Ethical Engagement at Home and Abroad, and, if you decide to buy a copy, use the discount code Eric and Richard shared with us to get 20% off the price of the book: CBGL20.

Globalsl gathers teaching tools, activities, and syllabi, as well as more than 500 peer-reviewed resources on community-campus partnerships for ethical global learning. A growing breadth and diversity of organizations and institutions support the globalsl network, offering regular gatherings among a growing community of practice, collaborating on evaluation and assessment, and advancing fair trade learning principles of ethical partnership. The globalsl blog offers regular reflections and insights relevant to community-based global learning. To get involved, follow globalsl by signing up for email updates, or connecting on Facebook or Twitter, then consider authoring a blog post, attending a gathering, or becoming a member.

Eric Hartman is curious about the ways in which social transformation is simultaneously personal and structural, and thrilled to be working on both as Executive Director of The Haverford College Center for Peace and Global Citizenship. He is lead author of Community-Based Global Learning: The Theory and Practice of Ethical Engagement at Home and Abroad and has written for several peer reviewed and popular publications including The Stanford Social Innovation Review,  International EducatorTourism and Hospitality Researchand The Michigan Journal of Community Service-Learning. Eric served as executive director of a community-driven global nonprofit organization, Amizade, and taught on human rights, transdisciplinary research methods, and globalization in global studies programs at Arizona State University and Providence College. With a PhD in International Development from the University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public and International Affairs, Eric has worked in cross-cultural development practice and education in Bolivia, Ecuador, Ghana, Jamaica, Northern Ireland, Tanzania, and throughout the United States.   He co-founded both globalsl.org and the global engagement survey (GES), initiatives that advance best practices in global learning and cooperative development within community-campus partnerships.

 

Richard Kiely currently serves as Senior Fellow in the Office of Engagement Initiatives as part of Engaged Cornell, a large scale community engagement initiative at Cornell University.  As a community engaged scholar and practitioner, he is interested in learning about and contributing to the different ways people work together to have a positive impact on the world and the potential role of community engaged learning and research in higher education in facilitating that process. In 2005, Richard was recognized nationally as a John Glenn Scholar in Service-Learning for his longitudinal research that led to the development of a transformative service-learning model (Kiely, 2004, 2005, 2011). Richard has been faculty at the University of Georgia and Cornell and co-taught a graduate/undergraduate service-learning course in City & Regional Planning as part of the New Orleans Planning Initiative (NOPI).  The participants in this course developed a comprehensive recovery plan, in conjunction with community partners and Ninth Ward residents in New Orleans. A number of participants collaborated on a book describing the their experience with NOPI in Rebuilding Community after Katrina: Transformative Education in the New Orleans Planning Initiative (Reardon & Forester, 2016). Richard’s research focuses on institutional models that foster sustainable campus-community partnerships, faculty development in community engagement, community-based research, (global) service-learning, and critical reflection, as well as the transformational learning processes and outcomes that occur in community-engaged courses and community-based research programs.  Richard is also a co-founder of globalsl a multi-institutional hub supporting ethical global learning and community campus partnerships and continues to be an active scholar in the area of service-learning and community engagement in higher education.

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We Teach Languages Episode 46: Labor Issues and Language Teaching with Mura Nava

In episode 46, Stacey interviews Mura Nava, who teaches English to adults in France, about the state of the ELT (English Language Teaching) labor market. Mura shares his experiences as an English teacher in France and introduces us to some individuals and organizations working for justice for teachers. The episode also includes some information about adjunct labor in US higher education.

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Show Notes

We welcome feedback, resources, and diverse perspectives on this topic! To contribute to the conversation started here, leave us a voicemail or send a text message to (629)888-3398. Or you can follow us on Twitter @weteachlang or use this contact form to send us an email.

You can read Mura on his website ELF Notes or on Twitter @muranava. He also blogs at the website for the Teachers as Workers SIG. 

Here is Mura’s post we refer to in the episode: https://eflnotes.wordpress.com/2017/11/22/improving-working-conditions-isnt-that-in-the-remit-of-teacher-associations/ and the tweet we refer to!

Mura shared some organizations in Europe working to organize teachers including…

…SLB Cooperative in Spain on the web or on Twitter

…TEFL Guild on the web or on Twitter

…TAW SIG on the web or on Twitter

…ELT Advocacy on the web or on Twitter

Check out Geoffrey Jordan’s blog and the specific post Mura mentioned, and Twitter account that Mura mentioned in the episode.

Paul Walsh also has a blog.

For a hodgepodge of resources I dug up about ELT (English Language Teaching) around the world…

…an academic paper called Perspectives from within: Adjunct, foreign, English-language teachers in the internationalization of Japanese universities by Craig Whitsed and Peter Wright

…an article from the Japan Times For Japan’s English teachers, rays of hope amid the race to the bottom by Craig Currie-Robson

For resources on the adjunct labor market in the US and Canada…

…American Association of University Professors [AAUP]. (n.d.). Background facts on contingent faculty. Retrieved from https://www.aaup.org/issues/contingency/background-facts

…Modern Language Association Committee on Contingent Labor in the Profession [MLA]. (June 2011). Professional employment practices for non-tenure track faculty members: Recommendations and evaluative questions. Retrieved from http://www.mla.org/pdf/clip_stmt_final_may11.pdf

…this article from the Atlantic called There Is No Excuse for How Universities Treat Adjuncts by Caroline Fredrickson

…this guardian piece by James Hoff Are adjunct professors the fast-food workers of the academic world?

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We Teach Languages Episode 45: Thematic Units and Social Justice with Anneke Oppewal and Jennifer Wooten

In episode 45, Stacey talks with Anneke Oppewal, a middle school teacher in North Carolina, and Jennifer Wooten, a college instructor in Florida, about how they have transformed units on food and housing by focusing on questions accessible to novice and intermediate students. Anneke and Jen share specific examples from their own teaching–lessons and units they have built over time through collaboration and experimentation.

 

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Show Notes

We welcome feedback, resources, and diverse perspectives on this topic! To contribute to the conversation started here, leave us a voicemail or send a text message to (629)888-3398. Or you can follow us on Twitter @weteachlang or use this contact form to send us an email.

Both Jen and Anneke expressed that they would love to hear from listeners and possibly even collaborate with others doing similar work. You can email Jennifer Wooten here. You can email Anneke here or follow her on Twitter @an_oppewal

Resources…

…Anneke’s mini-unit on La Cosecha

EdPuzzle, a tool mentioned by Anneke that lets you turn videos into interactive quizzes

…Jen, Anneke, and a colleague’s ACTFL 2016 presentation on social justice that touches on many of the same issues discussed in this episode

…Jen, Anneke, and two colleagues’ ACTFL 2017 presentation on social justice that touches on many of the same themes as this episode.

…the book Anneke mentioned by Maria Souto-Manning with a forward by Sonia Nieto Multicultural Teaching in the Early Childhood Classroom.

…Terry ‘Osborn’s book Teaching World Languages for Social Justice.

Words and Actions: Teaching World Languages Through the Lens of Social Justice

ACTFL’s Critical and Social Justice Approaches SIG

Past episodes mentioned…

…check out ep 43 with Ryuko Kubota

…and ep 44 with Terry Osborn

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We Teach Languages Episode 44: A Preview of the 2018 Dimension Special Issue with Terry A. Osborn

In episode 44, Stacey shares an interview with Terry Osborn that she conducted as part of the 2018 issue of Dimension, the peer-reviewed journal of the Southern Conference on Language Teaching (SCOLT) . This special issue, which Stacey co-edited with Paula Garrett-Rucks, contains seven chapters all focused on how critical pedagogy and social justice play out in the language classroom. Listeners will get to hear a portion of the interview with Dr. Terry A. Osborn that comprises the first chapter of this special issue.

 

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Show Notes

We welcome feedback, resources, and diverse perspectives on this topic! To contribute to the conversation started here, leave us a voicemail or send a text message to (629)888-3398. Or you can follow us on Twitter @weteachlang or use this contact form to send us an email.

You can find Terry Osborn here. 

Resources…

…Terry’s book Teaching World Languages for Social Justice.

…Terry’s book with Reagan called The Foreign Language Educator in Society.

Dimension, a peer-reviewed journal from the Southern Conference on Language Teaching (SCOLT)

Words and Actions: Teaching World Languages Through the Lens of Social Justice

ACTFL’s Critical and Social Justice Approaches SIG

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We Teach Languages Episode 43: Common Misconceptions in English Language Teaching with Ryuko Kubota

In episode 43, Stacey asks Ryuko Kubota, a professor of language and literacy education at the University of British Colombia in Vancouver, Canada, about a recent publication in which she explores ten common misconceptions in English language teaching (ELT). Ryuko talks about several of those misconceptions, including how beliefs about native speakers, whiteness, and legitimate forms of language contribute to the general public’s understanding of who is a good language teacher. Although this interview centers on ELT, teachers of all languages will find points of relevance to their own work.

 

 

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Show Notes

We welcome feedback, resources, and diverse perspectives on this topic! To contribute to the conversation started here, leave us a voicemail or send a text message to (629)888-3398. Or you can follow us on Twitter @weteachlang or use this contact form to send us an email.

You can find Professor Ryuko Kubota at her faculty page.

The article we discussed in this episode…

…Kubota, R. (2016). A Critical Examination of Common Beliefs about Language Teaching:  From Research Insights to Professional Engagement. Epoch making in English language teaching and learning (pp. 348-365). Taipei: English Teachers’ Association-Republic of China (ETA-ROC). (available on academia.edu)

Resources to dive a bit deeper into the topics discussed here…

…Kubota, R. (2013). “Language is only a tool’”: Japanese expatriates working in China and implications for language teaching. Multilingual Education, 3(4). Available from http://www.multilingual-education.com/content/3/1/4

…Kubota, R. (in press). Unpacking research/practice gaps and complicities in WE and SLA research. World Englishes.

…Stanley, P. (2013). A critical ethnography of ‘Westerners’ teaching English in China: Shanghaied in Shanghai. New York, NY: Routledge.

Also check out episode 12 with Laurel Abreu for more on representation in language learning materials from the U.S. world languages perspective.

The first episode in our series on critical pedagogy and social justice was episode 42 with Daniel Woolsey.

And please check out the 2018 special issue of Dimension, SCOLT‘s peer-reviewed annual journal, available now online and open-access.

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We Teach Languages Episode 42: Choosing Critical Cultural Content over Grammar with Daniel Woolsey

In episode 42, Stacey interviews Daniel Woolsey, an associate professor of Spanish at a liberal arts college in Michigan, who teaches courses including fourth-semester Spanish and Hispanic linguistics. Daniel explains that language teachers can focus on critical cultural content, let go of explicit grammar instruction, and trust the acquisition process to take place.

In the month of March, we will be focusing on social justice and critical perspectives on language teaching to celebrate the March release of a special issue of Dimension, SCOLT‘s peer-reviewed journal. In this first of five episodes, Daniel Woolsey gets us started by showing that we can let go of grammar and embrace critical cultural content as the core of our classes.

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Show Notes

We welcome feedback, resources, and diverse perspectives on this topic! To contribute to the conversation started here, leave us a voicemail or send a text message to (629)888-3398. Or you can follow us on Twitter @weteachlang or use this contact form to send us an email.

Daniel Woolsey grew up in Santiago, Chile, and earned his Ph.D. in Language Education from Indiana University. He has been teaching Spanish at the college level for twenty years, including courses in Hispanic Linguistics and Language Teaching Methods. Daniel is especially passionate about first- and second-year Spanish courses: bridging SLA theory with teaching practices, and incorporating critical topics from culture, history and literature into beginning levels of instruction. He is co-author of two textbooks for first and second year Spanish courses, Ritmos: Beginning Spanish Language & Culture (2012, 2017) and its forthcoming intermediate counterpart Rostros (2019). Info and free demo of his textbooks can be found at: https://evialearning.com/ritmos-store.

For more information and to connect with Daniel, visit his faculty page.

For instructors interested in moving toward content-based communicative teaching, he recommends some resources…

Making Communicative Language Teaching Happen, by James Lee and Bill VanPatten

How Language Are Learned, by Patsy Lightbown and Nina Spada

…Bill VanPatten’s podcast Tea with BVP (Daniel loves whatever BVP is doing!)

Resources from the show…

…The 2017 conference https://hope.edu/academics/modern-classical-languages/crisis-management-innovation/

more about James Lee, the instructor Daniel mentioned from Indiana University

…MLA 2007 white paper Foreign Languages and Higher Education: New Structures for a Changed World

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