We Teach Languages Episode 61: A Throwback Episode with Dorie Conlon Perugini and Manuela Wagner

In episode 61, Stacey looks back at two episodes from 2017 in which two of the editors of the book Intercultural Communicative Competence Across the Age Range discuss the book’s origins and ideas. Check out the show notes for links to the full episodes as well as useful resources related to intercultural communicative competence.

 

Or listen on iTunes!

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Show Notes

We welcome feedback, resources, and diverse perspectives on this topic! To contribute to the conversation started here, leave us a voicemail or send a text message to (629)888-3398. Or you can follow us on Twitter @weteachlang or use this contact form to send us an email.

Dorie was originally on episode 8 and Manuela was originally on episode 27

Teaching Intercultural Competence Across the Age Range From Theory to Practice Edited by: Manuela Wagner, Dorie Conlon Perugini, Michael Byram

A few more resources on intercultural communicative competence…

… Byram’s excellent book Teaching and Assessing Intercultural Communicative Competence (ICC)

an entire issue of The Language Educator was dedicated to ICC in 2015. Manuela Wagner and Michael Byram wrote an article in that issue (as did Stacey Margarita Johnson, by the way)

an introduction to the intercultural dimension of language teaching by Michael Byram

an article by Michael Byram

an alternative take on ICC

We Teach Languages Episode 60: Community-Based Global Learning, Part II with Richard Kiely and Eric Hartman

In episode 60, Eric Hartman and Richard Kiely respond to listener questions about service learning based on their book Community-Based Global Learning: The Theory and Practice of Ethical Engagement at Home and Abroad. Richard and Eric approach community-based learning and global service learning from perspectives that language teachers will find immediately applicable to their own work whether they are taking their students into L2 communities as part of a course or preparing their students for lifelong community engagement as proficient language users.

This week’s episode is part II of the interview. Also check out episode 59 to hear part I in which Richard and Eric discuss the principles and experiences that inspired them to write their book.

Or listen on iTunes!

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Show Notes

We welcome feedback, resources, and diverse perspectives on this topic! To contribute to the conversation started here, leave us a voicemail or send a text message to (629)888-3398. Or you can follow us on Twitter @weteachlang or use this contact form to send us an email.

Check out the book Community-Based Global Learning: The Theory and Practice of Ethical Engagement at Home and Abroad, and, if you decide to buy a copy, use the discount code Eric and Richard shared with us to get 20% off the price of the book: CBGL20.

One WTL listener won a free copy of Richard and Eric’s book from Stylus Publishing!

Globalsl gathers teaching tools, activities, and syllabi, as well as more than 500 peer-reviewed resources on community-campus partnerships for ethical global learning. A growing breadth and diversity of organizations and institutions support the globalsl network, offering regular gatherings among a growing community of practice, collaborating on evaluation and assessment, and advancing fair trade learning principles of ethical partnership. The globalsl blog offers regular reflections and insights relevant to community-based global learning. To get involved, follow globalsl by signing up for email updates, or connecting on Facebook or Twitter, then consider authoring a blog post, attending a gathering, or becoming a member.

Eric Hartman is curious about the ways in which social transformation is simultaneously personal and structural, and thrilled to be working on both as Executive Director of The Haverford College Center for Peace and Global Citizenship. He is lead author of Community-Based Global Learning: The Theory and Practice of Ethical Engagement at Home and Abroad and has written for several peer reviewed and popular publications including The Stanford Social Innovation Review,  International EducatorTourism and Hospitality Researchand The Michigan Journal of Community Service-Learning. Eric served as executive director of a community-driven global nonprofit organization, Amizade, and taught on human rights, transdisciplinary research methods, and globalization in global studies programs at Arizona State University and Providence College. With a PhD in International Development from the University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public and International Affairs, Eric has worked in cross-cultural development practice and education in Bolivia, Ecuador, Ghana, Jamaica, Northern Ireland, Tanzania, and throughout the United States.   He co-founded both globalsl.org and the global engagement survey (GES), initiatives that advance best practices in global learning and cooperative development within community-campus partnerships.

Richard Kiely currently serves as Senior Fellow in the Office of Engagement Initiatives as part of Engaged Cornell, a large scale community engagement initiative at Cornell University.  As a community engaged scholar and practitioner, he is interested in learning about and contributing to the different ways people work together to have a positive impact on the world and the potential role of community engaged learning and research in higher education in facilitating that process. In 2005, Richard was recognized nationally as a John Glenn Scholar in Service-Learning for his longitudinal research that led to the development of a transformative service-learning model (Kiely, 2004, 2005, 2011). Richard has been faculty at the University of Georgia and Cornell and co-taught a graduate/undergraduate service-learning course in City & Regional Planning as part of the New Orleans Planning Initiative (NOPI).  The participants in this course developed a comprehensive recovery plan, in conjunction with community partners and Ninth Ward residents in New Orleans. A number of participants collaborated on a book describing the their experience with NOPI in Rebuilding Community after Katrina: Transformative Education in the New Orleans Planning Initiative (Reardon & Forester, 2016). Richard’s research focuses on institutional models that foster sustainable campus-community partnerships, faculty development in community engagement, community-based research, (global) service-learning, and critical reflection, as well as the transformational learning processes and outcomes that occur in community-engaged courses and community-based research programs.  Richard is also a co-founder of globalsl a multi-institutional hub supporting ethical global learning and community campus partnerships and continues to be an active scholar in the area of service-learning and community engagement in higher education.

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We Teach Languages Episode 59: Community-Based Global Learning, Part I with Richard Kiely and Eric Hartman

In episode 59, Stacey interviews Eric Hartman and Richard Kiely about the principles and experiences that inspired them to write the book Community-Based Global Learning. Richard and Eric approach international, community-based, and global service learning from perspectives that language teachers will find immediately applicable to their own work whether they are taking their students into L2 communities as part of a course or preparing their students for lifelong community engagement as proficient language users.

This week’s episode is part I of the interview. Stay tuned for episode 60 next week to hear part II in which Richard and Eric answer listener questions about community-based and global service learning.

Or listen on iTunes!

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Show Notes

We welcome feedback, resources, and diverse perspectives on this topic! To contribute to the conversation started here, leave us a voicemail or send a text message to (629)888-3398. Or you can follow us on Twitter @weteachlang or use this contact form to send us an email.

Check out the book Community-Based Global Learning: The Theory and Practice of Ethical Engagement at Home and Abroad, and, if you decide to buy a copy, use the discount code Eric and Richard shared with us to get 20% off the price of the book: CBGL20.

Globalsl gathers teaching tools, activities, and syllabi, as well as more than 500 peer-reviewed resources on community-campus partnerships for ethical global learning. A growing breadth and diversity of organizations and institutions support the globalsl network, offering regular gatherings among a growing community of practice, collaborating on evaluation and assessment, and advancing fair trade learning principles of ethical partnership. The globalsl blog offers regular reflections and insights relevant to community-based global learning. To get involved, follow globalsl by signing up for email updates, or connecting on Facebook or Twitter, then consider authoring a blog post, attending a gathering, or becoming a member.

Eric Hartman is curious about the ways in which social transformation is simultaneously personal and structural, and thrilled to be working on both as Executive Director of The Haverford College Center for Peace and Global Citizenship. He is lead author of Community-Based Global Learning: The Theory and Practice of Ethical Engagement at Home and Abroad and has written for several peer reviewed and popular publications including The Stanford Social Innovation Review,  International EducatorTourism and Hospitality Researchand The Michigan Journal of Community Service-Learning. Eric served as executive director of a community-driven global nonprofit organization, Amizade, and taught on human rights, transdisciplinary research methods, and globalization in global studies programs at Arizona State University and Providence College. With a PhD in International Development from the University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public and International Affairs, Eric has worked in cross-cultural development practice and education in Bolivia, Ecuador, Ghana, Jamaica, Northern Ireland, Tanzania, and throughout the United States.   He co-founded both globalsl.org and the global engagement survey (GES), initiatives that advance best practices in global learning and cooperative development within community-campus partnerships.

 

Richard Kiely currently serves as Senior Fellow in the Office of Engagement Initiatives as part of Engaged Cornell, a large scale community engagement initiative at Cornell University.  As a community engaged scholar and practitioner, he is interested in learning about and contributing to the different ways people work together to have a positive impact on the world and the potential role of community engaged learning and research in higher education in facilitating that process. In 2005, Richard was recognized nationally as a John Glenn Scholar in Service-Learning for his longitudinal research that led to the development of a transformative service-learning model (Kiely, 2004, 2005, 2011). Richard has been faculty at the University of Georgia and Cornell and co-taught a graduate/undergraduate service-learning course in City & Regional Planning as part of the New Orleans Planning Initiative (NOPI).  The participants in this course developed a comprehensive recovery plan, in conjunction with community partners and Ninth Ward residents in New Orleans. A number of participants collaborated on a book describing the their experience with NOPI in Rebuilding Community after Katrina: Transformative Education in the New Orleans Planning Initiative (Reardon & Forester, 2016). Richard’s research focuses on institutional models that foster sustainable campus-community partnerships, faculty development in community engagement, community-based research, (global) service-learning, and critical reflection, as well as the transformational learning processes and outcomes that occur in community-engaged courses and community-based research programs.  Richard is also a co-founder of globalsl a multi-institutional hub supporting ethical global learning and community campus partnerships and continues to be an active scholar in the area of service-learning and community engagement in higher education.

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We Teach Languages Episode 58: Principles of Outstanding Language Teaching with Steve Smith

In episode 58, Steve Smith discusses principles for language instruction that will help teachers navigate the complexity of the current post-methods era. Between book/blog writing, academic study, and classroom teaching, Steve is a perennial source of useful information for language teachers.

Or listen on iTunes!

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Show Notes

We welcome feedback, resources, and diverse perspectives on this topic! To contribute to the conversation started here, leave us a voicemail or send a text message to (629)888-3398. Or you can follow us on Twitter @weteachlang or use this contact form to send us an email.

Steve Smith was a French teacher for 33 years, and continues to write books, blog, create resources (frenchteacher.net), speak, and train teachers. He is a visiting lecturer for the University of Buckingham, UK, the author of Becoming an Outstanding Languages Teacher (Routledge, 2017), and co-author of The Language Teacher Toolkit (Createspace/Amazon, 2016) along with Gianfranco Conti who was featured in episodes 16 and 17. You can reach out to Steve by email, or on Twitter @spsmith45.

Resources mentioned on the show…

Dylan William on formative assessment

…Doug Lemov’s website and Twitter @Doug_Lemov

12 principles of second language learning from Steve’s blog

Michael Swan’s intensive input/output work

Steve’s web resources about using texts

…Steve also mentioned his co-author Gianfranco Conti whose blog The Language Gym is a terrific, research-based resource, and was featured in a two episodes last year on the podcast.

Episode 16: Making Research More Accessible to Teachers with Gianfranco Conti, Part I  and Episode 17: Gianfranco Conti, Part II

And look at Steve’s blog post about his interview experience!

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We Teach Languages Episode 57: CLIC Resources, TalkAbroad, and Online Teaching with Florencia Henshaw

In episode 57, Stacey interviews Dr. Florencia Henshaw, Director of the Center for Language Instruction and Coordination (CLIC) at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign. Florencia discusses some of the resources CLIC has to offer teachers such as free online webinars, how the virtual exchange tool TalkAbroad is making a difference in Florencia’s program, and some of the ways that concepts from second language acquisition should be applied to online language teaching.

Or listen on iTunes!

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Show Notes

We welcome feedback, resources, and diverse perspectives on this topic! To contribute to the conversation started here, leave us a voicemail or send a text message to (629)888-3398. Or you can follow us on Twitter @weteachlang or use this contact form to send us an email.

Dr. Florencia Henshaw holds a PhD in Second Language Acquisition and Teacher Education and is a certified Oral Proficiency Interview (OPI) tester in Spanish and the author of two Spanish textbooks. She is also the recipient of the 2018 Excellence in Language Instruction Award within the School of Literatures, Cultures, and Linguistics at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign. You can reach out to Florencia by email, or you can like CLIC on Facebook or follow the center on Pinterest.

Resources mentioned on the show…

…CLIC’s bank of classroom observation form 

…the archive of freely available webinars

TalkAbroad

 

 

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We Teach Languages Episode 56: How to Write Comprehensible Texts with Martina Bex

In episode 56, Stacey talks with Martina Bex, whom many listeners might recognize from her blog, the Comprehensible Classroom. Martina tells us about her journey of figuring out what works best for her classroom and outlines how teachers can write comprehensible texts for their students. If you want to create your own level-appropriate written and oral L2 texts in order to bring in culture or current events, this episode will get you started.

Or listen on iTunes!

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Show Notes

We welcome feedback, resources, and diverse perspectives on this topic! To contribute to the conversation started here, leave us a voicemail or send a text message to (629)888-3398. Or you can follow us on Twitter @weteachlang or use this contact form to send us an email.

You can learn more about Martina Bex and the resources she makes available on her website The Comprehensible Classroom, on Facebook, or on Twitter @MartinaBex

Check out this excellent blog post Martina wrote in response to a listener question about this episode!

Martina read from the leveled reader about Brandon wanting a big dog. You can find that book along with others by Fluency Matters here.

Note: At one point in the interview, I refer to talking about culture using “your 10%”. I was referring to the ACTFL guideline of using the target language 90+% of the time during instruction, and how teachers might use that 10% of L1 in class.

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We Teach Languages Episode 55: L2 Writing Instruction and Corrective Feedback with Heather Willis Allen

In episode 55, Stacey learns about designing instruction that promotes L2 writing development from Dr. Heather Willis Allen, associate professor of French at the University of Wisconsin – Madison. Heather is an accomplished teacher and researcher, co-author of a 2016 book on multiliteracies along with Kate Paesani and Beatrice Dupuy, and brings a research-informed perspective to topics such as how to provide written corrective feedback and how to scaffold assignments to help students avoid common writing pitfalls.

Or listen on iTunes!

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Show Notes

We welcome feedback, resources, and diverse perspectives on this topic! To contribute to the conversation started here, leave us a voicemail or send a text message to (629)888-3398. Or you can follow us on Twitter @weteachlang or use this contact form to send us an email.

You can learn more about Heather Willis Allen on her faculty page and can access many of her publications here.

You might remember Heather’s co-author Dr. Kate Paesani from Episode 49: Multiliteracies and CARLA Resources for Teachers with Kate Paesani

Some resources mentioned on the show…

…The Foreign Language Annals article Students’ and Instructors’ Perceived Value of Language and Content Curricular Goals by Nicole Mills & Samuel T. Moulton

The Undergraduate Spanish Major Curriculum: Faculty, Alumni, and Student Perceptions by Tammy Jandrey Hertel & Abby Dings

Hiram Maxim’s professional website where you can find quite a few PDFs of publications, including one paper on textual borrowing

 

Just as an aside, here is a resource on student writing that I really enjoyed and that presents another perspective. If you liked this episode, you might also enjoy this post from Senor Fernie: https://senorfernie.wordpress.com/2018/05/10/editing-final-projects-an-exercise-in-giving-up-micromanagement-part-1/

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We Teach Languages Episode 54: Keeping Pace with How Students and Methods are Changing with Mei Zhou

In episode 54, Sichen Wan interviews an EFL teacher that was influential in her own study of English, Mei Zhou. Mei teaches at a languages-focused high school in Chengdu, China and has been teaching for 18 years. In their conversation, Sichen asks Mei about what excellent language teaching looks like and Mei provides some great advice for new language teachers.

Or listen on iTunes!

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Show Notes

We welcome feedback, resources, and diverse perspectives on this topic! To contribute to the conversation started here, leave us a voicemail or send a text message to (629)888-3398. Or you can follow us on Twitter @weteachlang or use this contact form to send us an email.

Sichen is a graduate student in the English Language Learners program at Vanderbilt University. You can reach out to her by email to continue the conversation.

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We Teach Languages Episode 52: Story Listening and Efficient Acquisition with Beniko Mason

In episode 52, Dr. Beniko Mason joins the podcast to talk to Stacey about Story Listening and the most efficient way for learners to acquire language. In her four decades of teaching and researching, Dr. Mason has produced both impressive research as well as impressive results for her students. Be sure to check out the show notes to find links to her publications and current projects.

Or listen on iTunes!

_________

Show Notes

We welcome feedback, resources, and diverse perspectives on this topic! To contribute to the conversation started here, leave us a voicemail or send a text message to (629)888-3398. Or you can follow us on Twitter @weteachlang or use this contact form to send us an email.

Resources from the show…

…You can learn more about Beniko Mason and her work at her website.

… Storiesfirst.org is a resource for those interested in using Story Listening. Stories First Foundation was founded by two teachers, Claire Walter, a French and ESL teacher in Tennessee, and Kathrin Schectman, a German teacher in Erlangen, Germany.

…There is also a Facebook group Story Listening for Language Acquisition

…Beniko has published extensively. You can find a list of her publications here on her website, and Dr. Stephen Krashen also has several of their co-authored papers available on his website for download.

…Dr. Krashen and Dr. Mason have Story Listening workshops coming up this summer. You can find more information here: https://storiesfirst.org/learn/

Getting Started with Story Listening 
Learn the how and why of Story Listening in this one-day workshop with Beniko Mason and Stephen Krashen

Place: Los Angeles, CA 

Date: June 18, 2018
Time: 9:15 AM – 4:00 PM

Place: Portland, OR
Date: June 20, 2018
Time: 10:30 AM – 5:30 PM

Place: Syracuse, NY
Date: August 9, 2018 
Time: 9:15 – 4:00

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