We Teach Languages Episode 62: A Throwback on Advocacy and the Seal of Biliteracy with Amanda Seewald

In episode 62, Stacey kicks off a three-part series on the Seal of Biliteracy in the US by looking back at an episode from 2017 in which Caleb Howard interviewed Amanda Seewald about advocacy and the Seal of Biliteracy in the state of New Jersey. Check out the show notes for links to the full episode as well as useful resources related to the Seal of Biliteracy.

 

 

Or listen on iTunes!

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Show Notes

We welcome feedback, resources, and diverse perspectives on this topic! To contribute to the conversation started here, leave us a voicemail or send a text message to (629)888-3398. Or you can follow us on Twitter @weteachlang or use this contact form to send us an email.

Amanda originally appeared on episode 24

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We Teach Languages Episode 60: Community-Based Global Learning, Part II with Richard Kiely and Eric Hartman

In episode 60, Eric Hartman and Richard Kiely respond to listener questions about service learning based on their book Community-Based Global Learning: The Theory and Practice of Ethical Engagement at Home and Abroad. Richard and Eric approach community-based learning and global service learning from perspectives that language teachers will find immediately applicable to their own work whether they are taking their students into L2 communities as part of a course or preparing their students for lifelong community engagement as proficient language users.

This week’s episode is part II of the interview. Also check out episode 59 to hear part I in which Richard and Eric discuss the principles and experiences that inspired them to write their book.

Or listen on iTunes!

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Show Notes

We welcome feedback, resources, and diverse perspectives on this topic! To contribute to the conversation started here, leave us a voicemail or send a text message to (629)888-3398. Or you can follow us on Twitter @weteachlang or use this contact form to send us an email.

Check out the book Community-Based Global Learning: The Theory and Practice of Ethical Engagement at Home and Abroad, and, if you decide to buy a copy, use the discount code Eric and Richard shared with us to get 20% off the price of the book: CBGL20.

One WTL listener won a free copy of Richard and Eric’s book from Stylus Publishing!

Globalsl gathers teaching tools, activities, and syllabi, as well as more than 500 peer-reviewed resources on community-campus partnerships for ethical global learning. A growing breadth and diversity of organizations and institutions support the globalsl network, offering regular gatherings among a growing community of practice, collaborating on evaluation and assessment, and advancing fair trade learning principles of ethical partnership. The globalsl blog offers regular reflections and insights relevant to community-based global learning. To get involved, follow globalsl by signing up for email updates, or connecting on Facebook or Twitter, then consider authoring a blog post, attending a gathering, or becoming a member.

Eric Hartman is curious about the ways in which social transformation is simultaneously personal and structural, and thrilled to be working on both as Executive Director of The Haverford College Center for Peace and Global Citizenship. He is lead author of Community-Based Global Learning: The Theory and Practice of Ethical Engagement at Home and Abroad and has written for several peer reviewed and popular publications including The Stanford Social Innovation Review,  International EducatorTourism and Hospitality Researchand The Michigan Journal of Community Service-Learning. Eric served as executive director of a community-driven global nonprofit organization, Amizade, and taught on human rights, transdisciplinary research methods, and globalization in global studies programs at Arizona State University and Providence College. With a PhD in International Development from the University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public and International Affairs, Eric has worked in cross-cultural development practice and education in Bolivia, Ecuador, Ghana, Jamaica, Northern Ireland, Tanzania, and throughout the United States.   He co-founded both globalsl.org and the global engagement survey (GES), initiatives that advance best practices in global learning and cooperative development within community-campus partnerships.

Richard Kiely currently serves as Senior Fellow in the Office of Engagement Initiatives as part of Engaged Cornell, a large scale community engagement initiative at Cornell University.  As a community engaged scholar and practitioner, he is interested in learning about and contributing to the different ways people work together to have a positive impact on the world and the potential role of community engaged learning and research in higher education in facilitating that process. In 2005, Richard was recognized nationally as a John Glenn Scholar in Service-Learning for his longitudinal research that led to the development of a transformative service-learning model (Kiely, 2004, 2005, 2011). Richard has been faculty at the University of Georgia and Cornell and co-taught a graduate/undergraduate service-learning course in City & Regional Planning as part of the New Orleans Planning Initiative (NOPI).  The participants in this course developed a comprehensive recovery plan, in conjunction with community partners and Ninth Ward residents in New Orleans. A number of participants collaborated on a book describing the their experience with NOPI in Rebuilding Community after Katrina: Transformative Education in the New Orleans Planning Initiative (Reardon & Forester, 2016). Richard’s research focuses on institutional models that foster sustainable campus-community partnerships, faculty development in community engagement, community-based research, (global) service-learning, and critical reflection, as well as the transformational learning processes and outcomes that occur in community-engaged courses and community-based research programs.  Richard is also a co-founder of globalsl a multi-institutional hub supporting ethical global learning and community campus partnerships and continues to be an active scholar in the area of service-learning and community engagement in higher education.

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Community-Based Global Learning Book Giveaway Winner!

book cover

Back in May, we asked you all to send us your questions about service learning and community-engaged learning to win a copy of the new book Community-Based Global Learning: The Theory and Practice of Ethical Engagement at Home and Abroad (Stylus, 2018).

Listeners sent in lots of wonderful questions, several of which will be answered on episode 60, and we are excited to announce the winner of a free book:

Congratulations Sophia Chen from New Jersey, USA

8oaenwr9_400x400Sophia Chen is currently teaching Chinese at a public high school, and is passionate about helping students to acquire language, and using technology to facilitate its acquisition. She and her students are planning for a global service in summer, 2019.

We hope you enjoy your book from Stylus Publishing, and we cannot wait to share your global learning questions with the world on episode 60.

On behalf of the podcast, we’d like to thank Eric Hartman, Richard Kiely, and Stylus Publishing for providing the book for this giveaway.

If you are hoping for more chances to win, stay tuned. We’ll be hosting another book giveaway coming up this fall!

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We Teach Languages Episode 59: Community-Based Global Learning, Part I with Richard Kiely and Eric Hartman

In episode 59, Stacey interviews Eric Hartman and Richard Kiely about the principles and experiences that inspired them to write the book Community-Based Global Learning. Richard and Eric approach international, community-based, and global service learning from perspectives that language teachers will find immediately applicable to their own work whether they are taking their students into L2 communities as part of a course or preparing their students for lifelong community engagement as proficient language users.

This week’s episode is part I of the interview. Stay tuned for episode 60 next week to hear part II in which Richard and Eric answer listener questions about community-based and global service learning.

Or listen on iTunes!

_________

Show Notes

We welcome feedback, resources, and diverse perspectives on this topic! To contribute to the conversation started here, leave us a voicemail or send a text message to (629)888-3398. Or you can follow us on Twitter @weteachlang or use this contact form to send us an email.

Check out the book Community-Based Global Learning: The Theory and Practice of Ethical Engagement at Home and Abroad, and, if you decide to buy a copy, use the discount code Eric and Richard shared with us to get 20% off the price of the book: CBGL20.

Globalsl gathers teaching tools, activities, and syllabi, as well as more than 500 peer-reviewed resources on community-campus partnerships for ethical global learning. A growing breadth and diversity of organizations and institutions support the globalsl network, offering regular gatherings among a growing community of practice, collaborating on evaluation and assessment, and advancing fair trade learning principles of ethical partnership. The globalsl blog offers regular reflections and insights relevant to community-based global learning. To get involved, follow globalsl by signing up for email updates, or connecting on Facebook or Twitter, then consider authoring a blog post, attending a gathering, or becoming a member.

Eric Hartman is curious about the ways in which social transformation is simultaneously personal and structural, and thrilled to be working on both as Executive Director of The Haverford College Center for Peace and Global Citizenship. He is lead author of Community-Based Global Learning: The Theory and Practice of Ethical Engagement at Home and Abroad and has written for several peer reviewed and popular publications including The Stanford Social Innovation Review,  International EducatorTourism and Hospitality Researchand The Michigan Journal of Community Service-Learning. Eric served as executive director of a community-driven global nonprofit organization, Amizade, and taught on human rights, transdisciplinary research methods, and globalization in global studies programs at Arizona State University and Providence College. With a PhD in International Development from the University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public and International Affairs, Eric has worked in cross-cultural development practice and education in Bolivia, Ecuador, Ghana, Jamaica, Northern Ireland, Tanzania, and throughout the United States.   He co-founded both globalsl.org and the global engagement survey (GES), initiatives that advance best practices in global learning and cooperative development within community-campus partnerships.

 

Richard Kiely currently serves as Senior Fellow in the Office of Engagement Initiatives as part of Engaged Cornell, a large scale community engagement initiative at Cornell University.  As a community engaged scholar and practitioner, he is interested in learning about and contributing to the different ways people work together to have a positive impact on the world and the potential role of community engaged learning and research in higher education in facilitating that process. In 2005, Richard was recognized nationally as a John Glenn Scholar in Service-Learning for his longitudinal research that led to the development of a transformative service-learning model (Kiely, 2004, 2005, 2011). Richard has been faculty at the University of Georgia and Cornell and co-taught a graduate/undergraduate service-learning course in City & Regional Planning as part of the New Orleans Planning Initiative (NOPI).  The participants in this course developed a comprehensive recovery plan, in conjunction with community partners and Ninth Ward residents in New Orleans. A number of participants collaborated on a book describing the their experience with NOPI in Rebuilding Community after Katrina: Transformative Education in the New Orleans Planning Initiative (Reardon & Forester, 2016). Richard’s research focuses on institutional models that foster sustainable campus-community partnerships, faculty development in community engagement, community-based research, (global) service-learning, and critical reflection, as well as the transformational learning processes and outcomes that occur in community-engaged courses and community-based research programs.  Richard is also a co-founder of globalsl a multi-institutional hub supporting ethical global learning and community campus partnerships and continues to be an active scholar in the area of service-learning and community engagement in higher education.

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We Teach Languages Episode 53: #langchat Stories with Diego Ojeda and Sara-Elizabeth Cottrell

In episode 53, Diego Ojeda and Sara-Elizabeth Cottrell, two of the founding moderators of the #langchat Twitter professional development network, invite us into a conversation about how #langchat got started, some of the challenges of engaging professionally across differences, and other topics related to every language teacher’s favorite online chat.

Or listen on iTunes!

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Show Notes

We welcome feedback, resources, and diverse perspectives on this topic! To contribute to the conversation started here, leave us a voicemail or send a text message to (629)888-3398. Or you can follow us on Twitter @weteachlang or use this contact form to send us an email.

Diego Ojeda is a secondary Spanish teacher in Louisville, Kentucky. You can learn more about his work on his webiste srojeda.com or you can reach out on Twitter @diegoojeda66.

Sara-Elizabeth Cottrell wears many hats as a World Languages specialist and the blogger behind musicuentos.com. You can reach out to her on Twitter @secottrell or Facebook.

Resources from the show…

#langchat weekly Twitter chat

… #langchat wiki

… #langchat summaries

Calico Spanish (Sara-Elizabeth mentioned she works here!)

…Diego’s new chat for Spanish teachers #charlaele1

 

 

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We Teach Languages Episode 48: Welcoming and Advocating for New Arrivals with Lesley Cioccarelli

In episode 48, Stacey hears from Australian educator, advocate, and
#AusELT administrator, Lesley Cioccarelli. Lesley explains some of the options for language learning and settlement available to recent immigrants in Australia. She also talks about the professional organizations that advocate for the best interests
of those learners and why teachers should be members of their local and national professional associations. If you have ever wanted to make your hometown a more welcoming place for migrants and refugees, this episode will inspire you to follow in Lesley’s footsteps and take local, grassroots action in your own city!

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Show Notes

We welcome feedback, resources, and diverse perspectives on this topic! To contribute to the conversation started here, leave us a voicemail or send a text message to (629)888-3398. Or you can follow us on Twitter @weteachlang or use this contact form to send us an email.

To learn more about Lesley and her work…

…Check out this video made at Lesley’s work, highlighting her passion for personal learning networks. You are going to LOVE this video: https://cit.edu.au/about/innovation/historymakers/lesley_cioccarelli

…You can also find Lesley on her blog or on Twitter @cioccas

…The day Lesley and Stacey did this interview, Lesley was on her way to a multicultural festival in her home city of Canberra. Here are some of the photos from that event!
…and of course she can always be found at #AusELT on Facebook and Twitter – an informal community of English language teachers in Australasia https://auselt.com/
Past episode mentioned on the show…

 

Resources and Organizations mentioned on the show…
…Stacey also mentioned #ELTchat, which Lesley does not administer, but does highly recommend  A social network for ELT professionals (across the world), offering mutual support and opportunities for Continuous Professional Development. http://eltchat.org/wordpress/ 
…Adult Migrant English Program (AMEP) https://www.education.gov.au/adult-migrant-english-program-0
….International Second Language Proficiency Rating (ISLPR):
…Certificates in Spoken and Written English (CSWE): On this site you can find an overview of each Certificate and some sample modules: https://ames.edu.au/curriculum/cswe-overview/
….This recent article may be of interest as it gives some background to some of Lesley’s discussion including changes over time in ESL in Australia: Oliver, R., Rochecouste, J. &  Nguyen, B. (2017). ESL in Australia – A chequered history. TESOL in Context, Volume 26, No.1, pp. 7-26. https://ojs.deakin.edu.au/index.php/tesol/article/download/700/640
…Australian Council of TESOL Associations (ACTA) our national professional association http://www.tesol.org.au/
….These are the projects Lesley mentioned as ways people can support/welcome refugees:
…Lesley also wanted to recommend the podcast Talk the Talk http://talkthetalkpodcast.com/  and Short Films Teachers Love, which is a podcast and a vodcast, with a YouTube channel so you can see bits of the films as the guests talk about them. SFTL is just starting its 3rd season. For specifically ESL or language teaching themed episodes check out:
  • Season 2, Episode 7 – Chinese Language Teaching – Rita Wang
  • Season 2, Episode 1 – English Language Teaching with James Taylor
  • Season 1, Episode 15 – English Language Teaching with Kieran Donaghy
  • Season 1, Episode 10 – EAL (English as an Additional Language), expat teaching with Nicole James
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We Teach Languages Episode 15: The Voc/zes podcast with Liz Lake and Stephanie Hernandez

In episode 15, Stacey turns the microphone around on Liz Lake and Stephanie Hernandez, two faculty members in the Department of Spanish and Portuguese at the University of Minnesota who started a podcast in order to provide their students with meaningful, authentic listening opportunities. They discuss their work and invite listeners to use their podcast episodes in their own classrooms.

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Show Notes

We welcome feedback, resources, and diverse perspectives on this topic! To contribute to the conversation started here, leave us a voicemail or send a text message to (629)888-3398. Or you can follow us on Twitter @weteachlang or use this contact form to send us an email.

Scholars and resources mentioned on the show:

The podcast Liza and Stephanie created: Voc/zes  https://soundcloud.com/user-749661530

More about the Voc/zes podcast https://cla.umn.edu/spanish-portuguese/news-events/story/voczes-minneapolis

On Twitter: @umnvoces

Liz Lake’s Faculty Profile: https://cla.umn.edu/about/directory/profile/lake0030

Stephanie Hernandez’s Faculty Profile: https://cla.umn.edu/about/directory/profile/ande2901

Podcasts Liz and Stephanie listen to:

WTF http://www.wtfpod.com/

Serial https://serialpodcast.org/

Radio Ambulante http://radioambulante.org/en/

Latino USA http://latinousa.org/

Alt Latino http://www.npr.org/sections/altlatino/